Rome: The Complete Second Season DVD

SKU ID #100505

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    Additional Details
  • Format: DVD
  • Rating: TV-MA
  • Number of Discs: 5
  • Run Time: 600 Minutes
  • Region: 1 Region?
  • Aspect Ratio: Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Studio: HBO Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: August 7, 2007
  • Packaging: Digi-Pack
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Audio:
    ENGLISH: Dolby Digital 5.1 [CC]
    SPANISH: Dolby Digital Stereo
  • Genre: TV Series
  • Color: Color
  • Includes:
    All Roads Lead To Rome Interactive Onscreen Guide Prepared by the Series' Co-Producer/Historical Consultant, Jonathan Stamp
    A Tale Of Two Romes - Ancient Rome Was Two Different Cities for Two Different Classes. See How the Patricians and the Plebs Differed in All Matters, from Jobs to Recreation to Religion.
    The Making Of Rome, Season II - Take a Tour of the Production of the Epic Series, from Costumes to Sets to Special Effects - Plus a Detailed Look at the Battle of Philippi
    The Rise Of Octavian: Rome's First Emperor - The Larger-Than-Life Story of the Cunning Boy Who Became the Most Powerful Man in Rome.
    Antony & Cleopatra - A Revealing Look at One of the Most Famous Love Affairs of All Time
    Five Revealing Audio Commentaries with Cast and Crew
  • Release Date: 2007
The year is 44 B.C. Julius Caesar has been assassinated and civil war threatens to destroy the Republic. In the void left by Caesar's demise, egos clash and numerous players jockey for position. The brutally ambitious Mark Antony attempts to solidify his power, aligning himself with Atia, but coming to blows with her cunning son Octavian, who has been anointed in Caesar's will as his only son and heir. Meanwhile Titus Pullo attempts to pull his friend Lucius Vorenus out of the darkness that has engulfed his soul in the wake of personal tragedy. For once again, the fates of these two mismatched soldiers seem inexorably tied to the fate of Rome itself.
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